For the boy crouched quietly on the hotel rooftop, the lights which glistened far below him reminded him of the sheer size of the city. Like thousands of fireflies, the expanse of colours drew him with their raw beauty.

The icy fingers of the wind snapped him back to reality and he pulled his jumper tighter around his skinny shoulders.

The sounds of the bustling city were perceptible if he listened hard enough. The traffic was distant but audible and the music from the night club on the corner was soft and melodic from this distance. These were reminders of the perpetually busy lives the people had.

Plumes of black smoke which had risen from the factories lingered just above him, looking over the city. It had always perplexed his young mind how the people below could continue to live their lives so ignorantly, in complete disregard of the angry cloud looming over the city.

Despite the thick smoke above him, the boy felt that he was on top of the world when he was in this spot, looking down on the lives of those below him.  He let his imagination take him to distant lands, where he was the ruler of an ancient kingdom, looking out over his army of warriors, commanding them to battle. It was times like these when he felt truly free to imagine whatever he wanted.

The sound of a train horn interrupted this scene and his army of warriors was replaced with the busy city again.

The boy took a deep breath and sighed, before erupting into a fit of coughing when the smoke burnt the inside of his nose. Even the colourful arrangement of lights far below was not enough for him to endure the cold and the fumes on the rooftop that night.

For a short while longer the boy looked over his kingdom before his small feet carried him down the dark stairwell he had come to know so well. The smell of mildew and mould resonating from the walls no longer bothered him.

With begrudging acceptance the boy and the looming buildings merged, as disconnected from each other as ever but forced to coexist.

. The faint sounds he had heard from the rooftop were now overwhelming, to the point where he could hardly hear himself think.

The beautiful myriad of lights he had seen were now intense and intrusive to his field of vision.

The boy ran like a deer in headlights, desperate to evade the blinding lights and loud noise. Deep down he knew that there was no escape for him, that he too would one day become a part of the city, a contributor to the pollutants thick in the air. Until then he was just a boy, an insignificant detail lost in the labyrinth of self-destruction, but still somehow able to admire it from afar.

Let me know what you think by leaving a comment! 

L.W

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